Toxicant-Nutrient Interaction as a Veritable Host Resistance Against Chemical Toxicity in the Rapidly Industrializing Developing Nations

Osaretin G. Igharo1, 2*, John I. Anetor2, Gloria O. Anetor3, Linda N. Nwobi2, 4, Augustine O. Osagie5, Joan O. Osunbor1
1Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria. 2Toxicology and Micronutrient Metabolism Unit, Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. 3Public Health Unit, School of Health Sciences, National Open University of Nigeria, Lagos, Nigeria. 4Department of Chemical Pathology, Benjamin Carson’s School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ogun State, Nigeria. 5Department of Medical Biochemistry, School of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria.
Corresponding Author: [email protected]; Tel: +2348038664896
Recieved Date: September 09, 2017; Accepted Date: October 18, 2017; Published Date: 05 November 2017
Citation: Igharo OG, Anetor JI, Anetor GO, Nwobi LN, Osagie AO, Osunbor JO. Toxicant-Nutrient Interaction as a Veritable Host Resistance Against Chemical Toxicity in the Rapidly Industrializing Developing Nations Trop J Nat Prod Res. 2017; 1(5):196-198. doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v1i5.4 https://doi.org//10.26538/tjnpr/v1i5.4
Copyright: © 2017 Igharo et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
ABSTRACT

Growing evidence indicates that chemical utilization including toxic waste in the developing countries is on the increase. These nations have limited facilities for sound chemical management involving production, use and disposal of chemicals with minimal adverse effects on human and environmental health. Though concerns are important to all nations, they appear particularly salient to the industrializing countries under pressures to achieve development and eradicate poverty yet with limited capacity for sound chemical management. This increases the risk of chemical toxicity, with consequences such as genotoxicity, cancer and teratogenicity. The growing chemical burden implies the need for an efficient and effective means of xenobiotic metabolism and host resistance. Relevant literature on nutrients and toxicants interaction in various search engines were reviewed. The possible role of host resistance, essentially involving nutritional modulation has been ignored. Nutrient-toxicant response pathways could be affordable strategies against excessive chemical exposure. Zinc, a prime micronutrient is an antioxidant [Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD)], component of p53, guardian of the genome; active in the repair of DNA damage and apoptosis; protective against carcinogenesis. Zinc also plays an important role in vitamin A metabolism, in turn important in differentiation and central to retinoids involved in gene expression. Zinc is important in all the stages of the cell cycle, derangement of which may be a pathway to carcinogenesis. Use of this and other protective nutrients including folate and selenium, among others, appears a veritable approach to improving host resistance against chemical toxicity and should be considered promising in developing nations.

Keywords: Chemical toxicity, Genotoxicity, Host resistance, Nutritional modulation, Toxicant-nutrient interact
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