Isolated Compounds from the Roots of Flabellaria paniculata Cav. (Malpighiaceae) and their Effects on MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v4i12.2

Authors

  • Oluwatosin O. Johnson Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lagos, CMUL Campus, Lagos 100254, Nigeria
  • Sarita G. Bhat Department of Biotechnology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi, South Kalamassery, Kerala, 680022, India
  • Gloria A. Ayoola Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lagos, CMUL Campus, Lagos 100254, Nigeria
  • Harikrishnan Madayath Department of Biotechnology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi, South Kalamassery, Kerala, 680022, India
  • Saipriya P. Puthusseri Department of Biotechnology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi, South Kalamassery, Kerala, 680022, India
  • Herbert Coker Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lagos, CMUL Campus, Lagos 100254, Nigeria

Keywords:

Breast cancer, Campesterol glucoside, Flabellaria paniculata, Sitosterol, Spectroscopy

Abstract

Flabellaria paniculata Cav. (Malpighiaceae) has been used for various medicinal purposes in West Africa. In southwest Nigeria, the roots are being used by traditional and Ayurveda practitioners for the treatment of breast cancer. This study was carried out on the investigation of Flabellaria paniculata roots, by establishing the inhibitory concentration of the crude extract, fractions and identifying possible compounds that may be responsible for the treatment or prevention of breast cancer in Nigeria. Crude methanol extract was obtained by percolation method. The compounds were isolated and purified by analytical thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography (CC). Isolated compounds were characterized using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). In-vitro activity was done by MTT (3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay using MCF-7 breast cancer cells line. Two known phytosterols were isolated from F. paniculata roots; Campesterol glucoside (1) and Sitosterol (2). Campesterol glucoside with (IC50 1.18±0.18 mg/mL) showed better activity than Sitosterol (1.79±0.14 mg/mL). The activities were less when compared to a standard anticancer drug, Paclitaxel (IC50 0.07±0.03 mg/mL). The two compounds were more active than a well-known flavonoid, Quercetrin with (IC50 2.05±0.16). The hexane fraction (0.97±0.05 mg/mL) was the most active among the fractions (ethylacetate 2.97±0.19, butanol 6.22±0.17 and water 4.10±0.13 mg/mL) tested. The isolated compounds may reveal the reason for the traditional use of this edicinal plant in breast cancer treatment in Southwest Nigeria and West Africa. Therefore, Campesterol glucoside may be exploited further for its potency clinically. 

 

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Published

2020-12-01

How to Cite

Johnson, O. O., Bhat, S. G., Ayoola, G. A., Madayath, H., Puthusseri, S. P., & Coker, H. (2020). Isolated Compounds from the Roots of Flabellaria paniculata Cav. (Malpighiaceae) and their Effects on MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells: doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v4i12.2. Tropical Journal of Natural Product Research (TJNPR), 4(12), 1033–1038. Retrieved from https://www.tjnpr.org/index.php/home/article/view/832